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Jar

Full Online Collection

Native American Collection

The Native American collection was initiated by Mrs. Henry Lang, one of the founders of MAM. It represents the cultural development of various peoples from the seven major culture areas in the United States--the Northwest Coast, California, the Southwest, the Plains, the Woodlands, the Southeast, and the Arctic. With more than 4,000 objects, the collection has particularly distinguished examples of basketry and jewelry. Contemporary artists such as Dan Namingha, Tony Abeyta, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, and Allan Houser are represented as well. Native American artists and artisans are frequent visitors to the Museum, offering talks and demonstrations.

Audrey and Norbert Gaelen Collection

Currently showcased in the Rand Gallery is pottery made in recent decades by Hopi and Pueblo Indian artists of the Southwest. This pottery is from a remarkable collection of almost 100 pieces donated to the Montclair Art Museum recently by notable art collectors Audrey and Norbert Gaelen. Through their generosity, the Museum's Native American art collection has been greatly enhanced with artwork of contemporary Native American artists. Among the many renowned potters represented in the Gaelen's gift are Margaret Tafoya, Nathan Youngblood, Lucy Martin Lewis, Dextra Quotskuyva, and Maria Montoya Martinez. On a business trip to Santa Fe, New Mexico, in the mid-1970s, the Gaelens became enthralled with the natural beauty of the southwestern landscape and Native American art. After returning many times to Santa Fe, they purchased a second home there. Over the years, they assembled their impressive collection by acquiring pottery from galleries in Santa Fe and surrounding pueblos where they became acquainted with many artists from families of potters. The art of Hopi and Pueblo pottery making is passed on from generation to generation among families. In many pueblos and Hopi villages with strong pottery traditions, some stretching back more than a thousand years, pottery making families experiment with their own styles and techniques while still maintaining the local pottery tradition. Over time, adaptations of traditional forms and decorations along with some dramatic, personal innovations have created the great diversity of modern Pueblo pottery, which is so evident in this display.
n.d.
Aragon, Dolores
Swirl Seed Pot

Full Online Collection

Native American Collection

The Native American collection was initiated by Mrs. Henry Lang, one of the founders of MAM. It represents the cultural development of various peoples from the seven major culture areas in the United States--the Northwest Coast, California, the Southwest, the Plains, the Woodlands, the Southeast, and the Arctic. With more than 4,000 objects, the collection has particularly distinguished examples of basketry and jewelry. Contemporary artists such as Dan Namingha, Tony Abeyta, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, and Allan Houser are represented as well. Native American artists and artisans are frequent visitors to the Museum, offering talks and demonstrations.

Audrey and Norbert Gaelen Collection

Currently showcased in the Rand Gallery is pottery made in recent decades by Hopi and Pueblo Indian artists of the Southwest. This pottery is from a remarkable collection of almost 100 pieces donated to the Montclair Art Museum recently by notable art collectors Audrey and Norbert Gaelen. Through their generosity, the Museum's Native American art collection has been greatly enhanced with artwork of contemporary Native American artists. Among the many renowned potters represented in the Gaelen's gift are Margaret Tafoya, Nathan Youngblood, Lucy Martin Lewis, Dextra Quotskuyva, and Maria Montoya Martinez. On a business trip to Santa Fe, New Mexico, in the mid-1970s, the Gaelens became enthralled with the natural beauty of the southwestern landscape and Native American art. After returning many times to Santa Fe, they purchased a second home there. Over the years, they assembled their impressive collection by acquiring pottery from galleries in Santa Fe and surrounding pueblos where they became acquainted with many artists from families of potters. The art of Hopi and Pueblo pottery making is passed on from generation to generation among families. In many pueblos and Hopi villages with strong pottery traditions, some stretching back more than a thousand years, pottery making families experiment with their own styles and techniques while still maintaining the local pottery tradition. Over time, adaptations of traditional forms and decorations along with some dramatic, personal innovations have created the great diversity of modern Pueblo pottery, which is so evident in this display.
1993
Candelario, Hubert
Media File
Acoma Jar

Full Online Collection

Native American Collection

The Native American collection was initiated by Mrs. Henry Lang, one of the founders of MAM. It represents the cultural development of various peoples from the seven major culture areas in the United States--the Northwest Coast, California, the Southwest, the Plains, the Woodlands, the Southeast, and the Arctic. With more than 4,000 objects, the collection has particularly distinguished examples of basketry and jewelry. Contemporary artists such as Dan Namingha, Tony Abeyta, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, and Allan Houser are represented as well. Native American artists and artisans are frequent visitors to the Museum, offering talks and demonstrations.

Audrey and Norbert Gaelen Collection

Currently showcased in the Rand Gallery is pottery made in recent decades by Hopi and Pueblo Indian artists of the Southwest. This pottery is from a remarkable collection of almost 100 pieces donated to the Montclair Art Museum recently by notable art collectors Audrey and Norbert Gaelen. Through their generosity, the Museum's Native American art collection has been greatly enhanced with artwork of contemporary Native American artists. Among the many renowned potters represented in the Gaelen's gift are Margaret Tafoya, Nathan Youngblood, Lucy Martin Lewis, Dextra Quotskuyva, and Maria Montoya Martinez. On a business trip to Santa Fe, New Mexico, in the mid-1970s, the Gaelens became enthralled with the natural beauty of the southwestern landscape and Native American art. After returning many times to Santa Fe, they purchased a second home there. Over the years, they assembled their impressive collection by acquiring pottery from galleries in Santa Fe and surrounding pueblos where they became acquainted with many artists from families of potters. The art of Hopi and Pueblo pottery making is passed on from generation to generation among families. In many pueblos and Hopi villages with strong pottery traditions, some stretching back more than a thousand years, pottery making families experiment with their own styles and techniques while still maintaining the local pottery tradition. Over time, adaptations of traditional forms and decorations along with some dramatic, personal innovations have created the great diversity of modern Pueblo pottery, which is so evident in this display.
n.d.
Estevan, Jennifer
Carved Pot

Full Online Collection

Native American Collection

The Native American collection was initiated by Mrs. Henry Lang, one of the founders of MAM. It represents the cultural development of various peoples from the seven major culture areas in the United States--the Northwest Coast, California, the Southwest, the Plains, the Woodlands, the Southeast, and the Arctic. With more than 4,000 objects, the collection has particularly distinguished examples of basketry and jewelry. Contemporary artists such as Dan Namingha, Tony Abeyta, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, and Allan Houser are represented as well. Native American artists and artisans are frequent visitors to the Museum, offering talks and demonstrations.

Audrey and Norbert Gaelen Collection

Currently showcased in the Rand Gallery is pottery made in recent decades by Hopi and Pueblo Indian artists of the Southwest. This pottery is from a remarkable collection of almost 100 pieces donated to the Montclair Art Museum recently by notable art collectors Audrey and Norbert Gaelen. Through their generosity, the Museum's Native American art collection has been greatly enhanced with artwork of contemporary Native American artists. Among the many renowned potters represented in the Gaelen's gift are Margaret Tafoya, Nathan Youngblood, Lucy Martin Lewis, Dextra Quotskuyva, and Maria Montoya Martinez. On a business trip to Santa Fe, New Mexico, in the mid-1970s, the Gaelens became enthralled with the natural beauty of the southwestern landscape and Native American art. After returning many times to Santa Fe, they purchased a second home there. Over the years, they assembled their impressive collection by acquiring pottery from galleries in Santa Fe and surrounding pueblos where they became acquainted with many artists from families of potters. The art of Hopi and Pueblo pottery making is passed on from generation to generation among families. In many pueblos and Hopi villages with strong pottery traditions, some stretching back more than a thousand years, pottery making families experiment with their own styles and techniques while still maintaining the local pottery tradition. Over time, adaptations of traditional forms and decorations along with some dramatic, personal innovations have created the great diversity of modern Pueblo pottery, which is so evident in this display.
ca. 1993
Garcia, Tammy
White Jar with Kiva Design and Ladder

Full Online Collection

Native American Collection

The Native American collection was initiated by Mrs. Henry Lang, one of the founders of MAM. It represents the cultural development of various peoples from the seven major culture areas in the United States--the Northwest Coast, California, the Southwest, the Plains, the Woodlands, the Southeast, and the Arctic. With more than 4,000 objects, the collection has particularly distinguished examples of basketry and jewelry. Contemporary artists such as Dan Namingha, Tony Abeyta, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, and Allan Houser are represented as well. Native American artists and artisans are frequent visitors to the Museum, offering talks and demonstrations.

Audrey and Norbert Gaelen Collection

Currently showcased in the Rand Gallery is pottery made in recent decades by Hopi and Pueblo Indian artists of the Southwest. This pottery is from a remarkable collection of almost 100 pieces donated to the Montclair Art Museum recently by notable art collectors Audrey and Norbert Gaelen. Through their generosity, the Museum's Native American art collection has been greatly enhanced with artwork of contemporary Native American artists. Among the many renowned potters represented in the Gaelen's gift are Margaret Tafoya, Nathan Youngblood, Lucy Martin Lewis, Dextra Quotskuyva, and Maria Montoya Martinez. On a business trip to Santa Fe, New Mexico, in the mid-1970s, the Gaelens became enthralled with the natural beauty of the southwestern landscape and Native American art. After returning many times to Santa Fe, they purchased a second home there. Over the years, they assembled their impressive collection by acquiring pottery from galleries in Santa Fe and surrounding pueblos where they became acquainted with many artists from families of potters. The art of Hopi and Pueblo pottery making is passed on from generation to generation among families. In many pueblos and Hopi villages with strong pottery traditions, some stretching back more than a thousand years, pottery making families experiment with their own styles and techniques while still maintaining the local pottery tradition. Over time, adaptations of traditional forms and decorations along with some dramatic, personal innovations have created the great diversity of modern Pueblo pottery, which is so evident in this display.
n.d.
Garcia, Wilfred
Pot

Full Online Collection

Native American Collection

The Native American collection was initiated by Mrs. Henry Lang, one of the founders of MAM. It represents the cultural development of various peoples from the seven major culture areas in the United States--the Northwest Coast, California, the Southwest, the Plains, the Woodlands, the Southeast, and the Arctic. With more than 4,000 objects, the collection has particularly distinguished examples of basketry and jewelry. Contemporary artists such as Dan Namingha, Tony Abeyta, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, and Allan Houser are represented as well. Native American artists and artisans are frequent visitors to the Museum, offering talks and demonstrations.

Audrey and Norbert Gaelen Collection

Currently showcased in the Rand Gallery is pottery made in recent decades by Hopi and Pueblo Indian artists of the Southwest. This pottery is from a remarkable collection of almost 100 pieces donated to the Montclair Art Museum recently by notable art collectors Audrey and Norbert Gaelen. Through their generosity, the Museum's Native American art collection has been greatly enhanced with artwork of contemporary Native American artists. Among the many renowned potters represented in the Gaelen's gift are Margaret Tafoya, Nathan Youngblood, Lucy Martin Lewis, Dextra Quotskuyva, and Maria Montoya Martinez. On a business trip to Santa Fe, New Mexico, in the mid-1970s, the Gaelens became enthralled with the natural beauty of the southwestern landscape and Native American art. After returning many times to Santa Fe, they purchased a second home there. Over the years, they assembled their impressive collection by acquiring pottery from galleries in Santa Fe and surrounding pueblos where they became acquainted with many artists from families of potters. The art of Hopi and Pueblo pottery making is passed on from generation to generation among families. In many pueblos and Hopi villages with strong pottery traditions, some stretching back more than a thousand years, pottery making families experiment with their own styles and techniques while still maintaining the local pottery tradition. Over time, adaptations of traditional forms and decorations along with some dramatic, personal innovations have created the great diversity of modern Pueblo pottery, which is so evident in this display.
n.d.
Juanico, Marie
Acoma Jar

Full Online Collection

Native American Collection

The Native American collection was initiated by Mrs. Henry Lang, one of the founders of MAM. It represents the cultural development of various peoples from the seven major culture areas in the United States--the Northwest Coast, California, the Southwest, the Plains, the Woodlands, the Southeast, and the Arctic. With more than 4,000 objects, the collection has particularly distinguished examples of basketry and jewelry. Contemporary artists such as Dan Namingha, Tony Abeyta, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, and Allan Houser are represented as well. Native American artists and artisans are frequent visitors to the Museum, offering talks and demonstrations.

100 Works for 100 Years

To celebrate its centennial, the Montclair Art Museum is featuring 100 works of American and Native American art from the collection, throughout its galleries and grounds. Identified with special labels, these works in a variety of mediums, ranging in date from the 18th century to the present, have been installed in phases throughout Fall 2013, with all on view as of January 15, 2014, the Museum's official birthday. Works by Asher B. Durand, John Frederick Kensett, Edward Hopper, Winslow Homer, Lorna Simpson, Will Barnet, and many others are featured. For more information about the museum’s history and events during its centennial year, please visit www.montclairartmuseum.org.

Audrey and Norbert Gaelen Collection

Currently showcased in the Rand Gallery is pottery made in recent decades by Hopi and Pueblo Indian artists of the Southwest. This pottery is from a remarkable collection of almost 100 pieces donated to the Montclair Art Museum recently by notable art collectors Audrey and Norbert Gaelen. Through their generosity, the Museum's Native American art collection has been greatly enhanced with artwork of contemporary Native American artists. Among the many renowned potters represented in the Gaelen's gift are Margaret Tafoya, Nathan Youngblood, Lucy Martin Lewis, Dextra Quotskuyva, and Maria Montoya Martinez. On a business trip to Santa Fe, New Mexico, in the mid-1970s, the Gaelens became enthralled with the natural beauty of the southwestern landscape and Native American art. After returning many times to Santa Fe, they purchased a second home there. Over the years, they assembled their impressive collection by acquiring pottery from galleries in Santa Fe and surrounding pueblos where they became acquainted with many artists from families of potters. The art of Hopi and Pueblo pottery making is passed on from generation to generation among families. In many pueblos and Hopi villages with strong pottery traditions, some stretching back more than a thousand years, pottery making families experiment with their own styles and techniques while still maintaining the local pottery tradition. Over time, adaptations of traditional forms and decorations along with some dramatic, personal innovations have created the great diversity of modern Pueblo pottery, which is so evident in this display.
1977
Lewis, Lucy Martin
Pot

Full Online Collection

Native American Collection

The Native American collection was initiated by Mrs. Henry Lang, one of the founders of MAM. It represents the cultural development of various peoples from the seven major culture areas in the United States--the Northwest Coast, California, the Southwest, the Plains, the Woodlands, the Southeast, and the Arctic. With more than 4,000 objects, the collection has particularly distinguished examples of basketry and jewelry. Contemporary artists such as Dan Namingha, Tony Abeyta, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, and Allan Houser are represented as well. Native American artists and artisans are frequent visitors to the Museum, offering talks and demonstrations.

Audrey and Norbert Gaelen Collection

Currently showcased in the Rand Gallery is pottery made in recent decades by Hopi and Pueblo Indian artists of the Southwest. This pottery is from a remarkable collection of almost 100 pieces donated to the Montclair Art Museum recently by notable art collectors Audrey and Norbert Gaelen. Through their generosity, the Museum's Native American art collection has been greatly enhanced with artwork of contemporary Native American artists. Among the many renowned potters represented in the Gaelen's gift are Margaret Tafoya, Nathan Youngblood, Lucy Martin Lewis, Dextra Quotskuyva, and Maria Montoya Martinez. On a business trip to Santa Fe, New Mexico, in the mid-1970s, the Gaelens became enthralled with the natural beauty of the southwestern landscape and Native American art. After returning many times to Santa Fe, they purchased a second home there. Over the years, they assembled their impressive collection by acquiring pottery from galleries in Santa Fe and surrounding pueblos where they became acquainted with many artists from families of potters. The art of Hopi and Pueblo pottery making is passed on from generation to generation among families. In many pueblos and Hopi villages with strong pottery traditions, some stretching back more than a thousand years, pottery making families experiment with their own styles and techniques while still maintaining the local pottery tradition. Over time, adaptations of traditional forms and decorations along with some dramatic, personal innovations have created the great diversity of modern Pueblo pottery, which is so evident in this display.
March 1985
Nampeyo, Tom Polacca
White Lidded Melon Jar

Full Online Collection

Native American Collection

The Native American collection was initiated by Mrs. Henry Lang, one of the founders of MAM. It represents the cultural development of various peoples from the seven major culture areas in the United States--the Northwest Coast, California, the Southwest, the Plains, the Woodlands, the Southeast, and the Arctic. With more than 4,000 objects, the collection has particularly distinguished examples of basketry and jewelry. Contemporary artists such as Dan Namingha, Tony Abeyta, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, and Allan Houser are represented as well. Native American artists and artisans are frequent visitors to the Museum, offering talks and demonstrations.

Audrey and Norbert Gaelen Collection

Currently showcased in the Rand Gallery is pottery made in recent decades by Hopi and Pueblo Indian artists of the Southwest. This pottery is from a remarkable collection of almost 100 pieces donated to the Montclair Art Museum recently by notable art collectors Audrey and Norbert Gaelen. Through their generosity, the Museum's Native American art collection has been greatly enhanced with artwork of contemporary Native American artists. Among the many renowned potters represented in the Gaelen's gift are Margaret Tafoya, Nathan Youngblood, Lucy Martin Lewis, Dextra Quotskuyva, and Maria Montoya Martinez. On a business trip to Santa Fe, New Mexico, in the mid-1970s, the Gaelens became enthralled with the natural beauty of the southwestern landscape and Native American art. After returning many times to Santa Fe, they purchased a second home there. Over the years, they assembled their impressive collection by acquiring pottery from galleries in Santa Fe and surrounding pueblos where they became acquainted with many artists from families of potters. The art of Hopi and Pueblo pottery making is passed on from generation to generation among families. In many pueblos and Hopi villages with strong pottery traditions, some stretching back more than a thousand years, pottery making families experiment with their own styles and techniques while still maintaining the local pottery tradition. Over time, adaptations of traditional forms and decorations along with some dramatic, personal innovations have created the great diversity of modern Pueblo pottery, which is so evident in this display.
n.d.
Padilla, Andrew
Blackware Pot

Full Online Collection

Native American Collection

The Native American collection was initiated by Mrs. Henry Lang, one of the founders of MAM. It represents the cultural development of various peoples from the seven major culture areas in the United States--the Northwest Coast, California, the Southwest, the Plains, the Woodlands, the Southeast, and the Arctic. With more than 4,000 objects, the collection has particularly distinguished examples of basketry and jewelry. Contemporary artists such as Dan Namingha, Tony Abeyta, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, and Allan Houser are represented as well. Native American artists and artisans are frequent visitors to the Museum, offering talks and demonstrations.

Audrey and Norbert Gaelen Collection

Currently showcased in the Rand Gallery is pottery made in recent decades by Hopi and Pueblo Indian artists of the Southwest. This pottery is from a remarkable collection of almost 100 pieces donated to the Montclair Art Museum recently by notable art collectors Audrey and Norbert Gaelen. Through their generosity, the Museum's Native American art collection has been greatly enhanced with artwork of contemporary Native American artists. Among the many renowned potters represented in the Gaelen's gift are Margaret Tafoya, Nathan Youngblood, Lucy Martin Lewis, Dextra Quotskuyva, and Maria Montoya Martinez. On a business trip to Santa Fe, New Mexico, in the mid-1970s, the Gaelens became enthralled with the natural beauty of the southwestern landscape and Native American art. After returning many times to Santa Fe, they purchased a second home there. Over the years, they assembled their impressive collection by acquiring pottery from galleries in Santa Fe and surrounding pueblos where they became acquainted with many artists from families of potters. The art of Hopi and Pueblo pottery making is passed on from generation to generation among families. In many pueblos and Hopi villages with strong pottery traditions, some stretching back more than a thousand years, pottery making families experiment with their own styles and techniques while still maintaining the local pottery tradition. Over time, adaptations of traditional forms and decorations along with some dramatic, personal innovations have created the great diversity of modern Pueblo pottery, which is so evident in this display.
n.d.
Suazo, Ron
Jar

Full Online Collection

Native American Collection

The Native American collection was initiated by Mrs. Henry Lang, one of the founders of MAM. It represents the cultural development of various peoples from the seven major culture areas in the United States--the Northwest Coast, California, the Southwest, the Plains, the Woodlands, the Southeast, and the Arctic. With more than 4,000 objects, the collection has particularly distinguished examples of basketry and jewelry. Contemporary artists such as Dan Namingha, Tony Abeyta, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, and Allan Houser are represented as well. Native American artists and artisans are frequent visitors to the Museum, offering talks and demonstrations.

Audrey and Norbert Gaelen Collection

Currently showcased in the Rand Gallery is pottery made in recent decades by Hopi and Pueblo Indian artists of the Southwest. This pottery is from a remarkable collection of almost 100 pieces donated to the Montclair Art Museum recently by notable art collectors Audrey and Norbert Gaelen. Through their generosity, the Museum's Native American art collection has been greatly enhanced with artwork of contemporary Native American artists. Among the many renowned potters represented in the Gaelen's gift are Margaret Tafoya, Nathan Youngblood, Lucy Martin Lewis, Dextra Quotskuyva, and Maria Montoya Martinez. On a business trip to Santa Fe, New Mexico, in the mid-1970s, the Gaelens became enthralled with the natural beauty of the southwestern landscape and Native American art. After returning many times to Santa Fe, they purchased a second home there. Over the years, they assembled their impressive collection by acquiring pottery from galleries in Santa Fe and surrounding pueblos where they became acquainted with many artists from families of potters. The art of Hopi and Pueblo pottery making is passed on from generation to generation among families. In many pueblos and Hopi villages with strong pottery traditions, some stretching back more than a thousand years, pottery making families experiment with their own styles and techniques while still maintaining the local pottery tradition. Over time, adaptations of traditional forms and decorations along with some dramatic, personal innovations have created the great diversity of modern Pueblo pottery, which is so evident in this display.
n.d.
Vigil, Carol
Blackware Vase

Full Online Collection

Native American Collection

The Native American collection was initiated by Mrs. Henry Lang, one of the founders of MAM. It represents the cultural development of various peoples from the seven major culture areas in the United States--the Northwest Coast, California, the Southwest, the Plains, the Woodlands, the Southeast, and the Arctic. With more than 4,000 objects, the collection has particularly distinguished examples of basketry and jewelry. Contemporary artists such as Dan Namingha, Tony Abeyta, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, and Allan Houser are represented as well. Native American artists and artisans are frequent visitors to the Museum, offering talks and demonstrations.

Audrey and Norbert Gaelen Collection

Currently showcased in the Rand Gallery is pottery made in recent decades by Hopi and Pueblo Indian artists of the Southwest. This pottery is from a remarkable collection of almost 100 pieces donated to the Montclair Art Museum recently by notable art collectors Audrey and Norbert Gaelen. Through their generosity, the Museum's Native American art collection has been greatly enhanced with artwork of contemporary Native American artists. Among the many renowned potters represented in the Gaelen's gift are Margaret Tafoya, Nathan Youngblood, Lucy Martin Lewis, Dextra Quotskuyva, and Maria Montoya Martinez. On a business trip to Santa Fe, New Mexico, in the mid-1970s, the Gaelens became enthralled with the natural beauty of the southwestern landscape and Native American art. After returning many times to Santa Fe, they purchased a second home there. Over the years, they assembled their impressive collection by acquiring pottery from galleries in Santa Fe and surrounding pueblos where they became acquainted with many artists from families of potters. The art of Hopi and Pueblo pottery making is passed on from generation to generation among families. In many pueblos and Hopi villages with strong pottery traditions, some stretching back more than a thousand years, pottery making families experiment with their own styles and techniques while still maintaining the local pottery tradition. Over time, adaptations of traditional forms and decorations along with some dramatic, personal innovations have created the great diversity of modern Pueblo pottery, which is so evident in this display.
n.d.
Youngblood, Mela
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