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Study for Vogels

Full Online Collection

Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection

Since their marriage in 1962, Dorothy and Herbert Vogel (d. 2012) assembled one of America’s most notable collections of contemporary art, especially drawings. As the adventurous couple began to explore the contemporary art scene, devoting time each weekend to visits to New York artists and galleries, they looked for works that appealed to them personally, and works that they wanted to live with, in their one-bedroom apartment in New York City. Civil servants by profession, Herb and Dorothy had limited funds to invest in their acquisitions, and lived solely on Dorothy’s salary as a librarian while using Herb’s postal worker salary to collect. Developing close, supportive friendships with artists who were influential for their collecting, the Vogels became captivated by minimal and conceptual art, finding pleasure in works which others found hard to appreciate. Their collection, however, has always encompassed a variety of aesthetic approaches, including abstract expressionism, post-minimalism, and diverse figurative directions. Since 1991 the Vogels have donated or designated as promised gifts over 1,000 works of art to the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. Furthermore, the Vogels’ collection has continued to grow, to a size that was too large to be housed in any one institution, which led to the creation of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States project. Through this program, the Vogels have donated a total of 2,500 works by 177 artists to 50 museums, personally chosen by the Vogels with the underlying goal of bringing contemporary artworks to institutions that may not otherwise have been able to acquire them. The Montclair Art Museum was fortunate to be designated the New Jersey recipient of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States.

Modern & Contemporary

The Montclair Art Museum’s collection of modern and contemporary art ranges from major works by such early 20th-century artists as George Bellows, Arthur Dove, Elsie Driggs, Marsden Hartley, Edward Hopper, Maurice Prendergast, and Joseph Stella, to significant examples by leading contemporary artists Gregory Crewdson, Barbara Kruger, James Siena, Kay WalkingStick, Carrie Mae Weems, and others. A bequest by artist Moses Soyer and his wife, Ida, greatly augmented the modern collection in 1974 with more than one 100 works by Chaim Gross, Raphael Soyer, Ben Shahn, Reginald Marsh, Phillip Evergood, and others. In 1985 the Museum became a major repository for the paintings, drawings, notebooks, and personal papers of Morgan Russell, a cofounder in 1912–13 of Synchromism, the first American modernist art movement, which stressed the potent role of color. Works by Robert Motherwell, Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko, Adolph Gottlieb, William Baziotes, Steve Wheeler, Kenzo Okada, Norman Lewis, Milton Avery, George Rickey, Richard Diebenkorn, and others exemplify the strengths of the Museum’s collection of art of the 1940s and 50s. Highlights of the collection representing the decades of the 1960s through the 80s include works by Andy Warhol, Louise Nevelson, Tony Smith, Josef Albers, Romare Bearden, Dennis Oppenheim, George Segal, Alice Neel, Philip Guston, George McNeil, Melvin Edwards, and Richard Anuskiewicz. In recent years the Museum has demonstrated its growing commitment to contemporary art with the acquisition of works by Chuck Close, Kiki Smith, Ryan McGinley, Alex Prager, Chakaia Booker, Charles Simonds, Vik Muniz, and others. A major gift in 2008 of works from the Herbert and Dorothy Vogel collection greatly augmented the Museum's modern and contemporary holdings with paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Will Barnet, Robert Barry, Lynda Benglis, Richard Hunt, Richard Tuttle, and many others.
1977
Barnet, Will
Untitled

Full Online Collection

Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection

Since their marriage in 1962, Dorothy and Herbert Vogel (d. 2012) assembled one of America’s most notable collections of contemporary art, especially drawings. As the adventurous couple began to explore the contemporary art scene, devoting time each weekend to visits to New York artists and galleries, they looked for works that appealed to them personally, and works that they wanted to live with, in their one-bedroom apartment in New York City. Civil servants by profession, Herb and Dorothy had limited funds to invest in their acquisitions, and lived solely on Dorothy’s salary as a librarian while using Herb’s postal worker salary to collect. Developing close, supportive friendships with artists who were influential for their collecting, the Vogels became captivated by minimal and conceptual art, finding pleasure in works which others found hard to appreciate. Their collection, however, has always encompassed a variety of aesthetic approaches, including abstract expressionism, post-minimalism, and diverse figurative directions. Since 1991 the Vogels have donated or designated as promised gifts over 1,000 works of art to the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. Furthermore, the Vogels’ collection has continued to grow, to a size that was too large to be housed in any one institution, which led to the creation of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States project. Through this program, the Vogels have donated a total of 2,500 works by 177 artists to 50 museums, personally chosen by the Vogels with the underlying goal of bringing contemporary artworks to institutions that may not otherwise have been able to acquire them. The Montclair Art Museum was fortunate to be designated the New Jersey recipient of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States.

Modern & Contemporary

The Montclair Art Museum’s collection of modern and contemporary art ranges from major works by such early 20th-century artists as George Bellows, Arthur Dove, Elsie Driggs, Marsden Hartley, Edward Hopper, Maurice Prendergast, and Joseph Stella, to significant examples by leading contemporary artists Gregory Crewdson, Barbara Kruger, James Siena, Kay WalkingStick, Carrie Mae Weems, and others. A bequest by artist Moses Soyer and his wife, Ida, greatly augmented the modern collection in 1974 with more than one 100 works by Chaim Gross, Raphael Soyer, Ben Shahn, Reginald Marsh, Phillip Evergood, and others. In 1985 the Museum became a major repository for the paintings, drawings, notebooks, and personal papers of Morgan Russell, a cofounder in 1912–13 of Synchromism, the first American modernist art movement, which stressed the potent role of color. Works by Robert Motherwell, Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko, Adolph Gottlieb, William Baziotes, Steve Wheeler, Kenzo Okada, Norman Lewis, Milton Avery, George Rickey, Richard Diebenkorn, and others exemplify the strengths of the Museum’s collection of art of the 1940s and 50s. Highlights of the collection representing the decades of the 1960s through the 80s include works by Andy Warhol, Louise Nevelson, Tony Smith, Josef Albers, Romare Bearden, Dennis Oppenheim, George Segal, Alice Neel, Philip Guston, George McNeil, Melvin Edwards, and Richard Anuskiewicz. In recent years the Museum has demonstrated its growing commitment to contemporary art with the acquisition of works by Chuck Close, Kiki Smith, Ryan McGinley, Alex Prager, Chakaia Booker, Charles Simonds, Vik Muniz, and others. A major gift in 2008 of works from the Herbert and Dorothy Vogel collection greatly augmented the Museum's modern and contemporary holdings with paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Will Barnet, Robert Barry, Lynda Benglis, Richard Hunt, Richard Tuttle, and many others.
1988
Barry, Robert
Father and Son

Full Online Collection

Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection

Since their marriage in 1962, Dorothy and Herbert Vogel (d. 2012) assembled one of America’s most notable collections of contemporary art, especially drawings. As the adventurous couple began to explore the contemporary art scene, devoting time each weekend to visits to New York artists and galleries, they looked for works that appealed to them personally, and works that they wanted to live with, in their one-bedroom apartment in New York City. Civil servants by profession, Herb and Dorothy had limited funds to invest in their acquisitions, and lived solely on Dorothy’s salary as a librarian while using Herb’s postal worker salary to collect. Developing close, supportive friendships with artists who were influential for their collecting, the Vogels became captivated by minimal and conceptual art, finding pleasure in works which others found hard to appreciate. Their collection, however, has always encompassed a variety of aesthetic approaches, including abstract expressionism, post-minimalism, and diverse figurative directions. Since 1991 the Vogels have donated or designated as promised gifts over 1,000 works of art to the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. Furthermore, the Vogels’ collection has continued to grow, to a size that was too large to be housed in any one institution, which led to the creation of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States project. Through this program, the Vogels have donated a total of 2,500 works by 177 artists to 50 museums, personally chosen by the Vogels with the underlying goal of bringing contemporary artworks to institutions that may not otherwise have been able to acquire them. The Montclair Art Museum was fortunate to be designated the New Jersey recipient of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States.

Modern & Contemporary

The Montclair Art Museum’s collection of modern and contemporary art ranges from major works by such early 20th-century artists as George Bellows, Arthur Dove, Elsie Driggs, Marsden Hartley, Edward Hopper, Maurice Prendergast, and Joseph Stella, to significant examples by leading contemporary artists Gregory Crewdson, Barbara Kruger, James Siena, Kay WalkingStick, Carrie Mae Weems, and others. A bequest by artist Moses Soyer and his wife, Ida, greatly augmented the modern collection in 1974 with more than one 100 works by Chaim Gross, Raphael Soyer, Ben Shahn, Reginald Marsh, Phillip Evergood, and others. In 1985 the Museum became a major repository for the paintings, drawings, notebooks, and personal papers of Morgan Russell, a cofounder in 1912–13 of Synchromism, the first American modernist art movement, which stressed the potent role of color. Works by Robert Motherwell, Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko, Adolph Gottlieb, William Baziotes, Steve Wheeler, Kenzo Okada, Norman Lewis, Milton Avery, George Rickey, Richard Diebenkorn, and others exemplify the strengths of the Museum’s collection of art of the 1940s and 50s. Highlights of the collection representing the decades of the 1960s through the 80s include works by Andy Warhol, Louise Nevelson, Tony Smith, Josef Albers, Romare Bearden, Dennis Oppenheim, George Segal, Alice Neel, Philip Guston, George McNeil, Melvin Edwards, and Richard Anuskiewicz. In recent years the Museum has demonstrated its growing commitment to contemporary art with the acquisition of works by Chuck Close, Kiki Smith, Ryan McGinley, Alex Prager, Chakaia Booker, Charles Simonds, Vik Muniz, and others. A major gift in 2008 of works from the Herbert and Dorothy Vogel collection greatly augmented the Museum's modern and contemporary holdings with paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Will Barnet, Robert Barry, Lynda Benglis, Richard Hunt, Richard Tuttle, and many others.
1992
Barry, Robert
 Art © Lynda Benglis/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY
Untitled

Full Online Collection

Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection

Since their marriage in 1962, Dorothy and Herbert Vogel (d. 2012) assembled one of America’s most notable collections of contemporary art, especially drawings. As the adventurous couple began to explore the contemporary art scene, devoting time each weekend to visits to New York artists and galleries, they looked for works that appealed to them personally, and works that they wanted to live with, in their one-bedroom apartment in New York City. Civil servants by profession, Herb and Dorothy had limited funds to invest in their acquisitions, and lived solely on Dorothy’s salary as a librarian while using Herb’s postal worker salary to collect. Developing close, supportive friendships with artists who were influential for their collecting, the Vogels became captivated by minimal and conceptual art, finding pleasure in works which others found hard to appreciate. Their collection, however, has always encompassed a variety of aesthetic approaches, including abstract expressionism, post-minimalism, and diverse figurative directions. Since 1991 the Vogels have donated or designated as promised gifts over 1,000 works of art to the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. Furthermore, the Vogels’ collection has continued to grow, to a size that was too large to be housed in any one institution, which led to the creation of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States project. Through this program, the Vogels have donated a total of 2,500 works by 177 artists to 50 museums, personally chosen by the Vogels with the underlying goal of bringing contemporary artworks to institutions that may not otherwise have been able to acquire them. The Montclair Art Museum was fortunate to be designated the New Jersey recipient of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States.

Modern & Contemporary

The Montclair Art Museum’s collection of modern and contemporary art ranges from major works by such early 20th-century artists as George Bellows, Arthur Dove, Elsie Driggs, Marsden Hartley, Edward Hopper, Maurice Prendergast, and Joseph Stella, to significant examples by leading contemporary artists Gregory Crewdson, Barbara Kruger, James Siena, Kay WalkingStick, Carrie Mae Weems, and others. A bequest by artist Moses Soyer and his wife, Ida, greatly augmented the modern collection in 1974 with more than one 100 works by Chaim Gross, Raphael Soyer, Ben Shahn, Reginald Marsh, Phillip Evergood, and others. In 1985 the Museum became a major repository for the paintings, drawings, notebooks, and personal papers of Morgan Russell, a cofounder in 1912–13 of Synchromism, the first American modernist art movement, which stressed the potent role of color. Works by Robert Motherwell, Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko, Adolph Gottlieb, William Baziotes, Steve Wheeler, Kenzo Okada, Norman Lewis, Milton Avery, George Rickey, Richard Diebenkorn, and others exemplify the strengths of the Museum’s collection of art of the 1940s and 50s. Highlights of the collection representing the decades of the 1960s through the 80s include works by Andy Warhol, Louise Nevelson, Tony Smith, Josef Albers, Romare Bearden, Dennis Oppenheim, George Segal, Alice Neel, Philip Guston, George McNeil, Melvin Edwards, and Richard Anuskiewicz. In recent years the Museum has demonstrated its growing commitment to contemporary art with the acquisition of works by Chuck Close, Kiki Smith, Ryan McGinley, Alex Prager, Chakaia Booker, Charles Simonds, Vik Muniz, and others. A major gift in 2008 of works from the Herbert and Dorothy Vogel collection greatly augmented the Museum's modern and contemporary holdings with paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Will Barnet, Robert Barry, Lynda Benglis, Richard Hunt, Richard Tuttle, and many others.
1998
Benglis, Lynda
Five Studies: 'Black Tower' and four unknown sculptures

Full Online Collection

Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection

Since their marriage in 1962, Dorothy and Herbert Vogel (d. 2012) assembled one of America’s most notable collections of contemporary art, especially drawings. As the adventurous couple began to explore the contemporary art scene, devoting time each weekend to visits to New York artists and galleries, they looked for works that appealed to them personally, and works that they wanted to live with, in their one-bedroom apartment in New York City. Civil servants by profession, Herb and Dorothy had limited funds to invest in their acquisitions, and lived solely on Dorothy’s salary as a librarian while using Herb’s postal worker salary to collect. Developing close, supportive friendships with artists who were influential for their collecting, the Vogels became captivated by minimal and conceptual art, finding pleasure in works which others found hard to appreciate. Their collection, however, has always encompassed a variety of aesthetic approaches, including abstract expressionism, post-minimalism, and diverse figurative directions. Since 1991 the Vogels have donated or designated as promised gifts over 1,000 works of art to the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. Furthermore, the Vogels’ collection has continued to grow, to a size that was too large to be housed in any one institution, which led to the creation of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States project. Through this program, the Vogels have donated a total of 2,500 works by 177 artists to 50 museums, personally chosen by the Vogels with the underlying goal of bringing contemporary artworks to institutions that may not otherwise have been able to acquire them. The Montclair Art Museum was fortunate to be designated the New Jersey recipient of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States.

Modern & Contemporary

The Montclair Art Museum’s collection of modern and contemporary art ranges from major works by such early 20th-century artists as George Bellows, Arthur Dove, Elsie Driggs, Marsden Hartley, Edward Hopper, Maurice Prendergast, and Joseph Stella, to significant examples by leading contemporary artists Gregory Crewdson, Barbara Kruger, James Siena, Kay WalkingStick, Carrie Mae Weems, and others. A bequest by artist Moses Soyer and his wife, Ida, greatly augmented the modern collection in 1974 with more than one 100 works by Chaim Gross, Raphael Soyer, Ben Shahn, Reginald Marsh, Phillip Evergood, and others. In 1985 the Museum became a major repository for the paintings, drawings, notebooks, and personal papers of Morgan Russell, a cofounder in 1912–13 of Synchromism, the first American modernist art movement, which stressed the potent role of color. Works by Robert Motherwell, Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko, Adolph Gottlieb, William Baziotes, Steve Wheeler, Kenzo Okada, Norman Lewis, Milton Avery, George Rickey, Richard Diebenkorn, and others exemplify the strengths of the Museum’s collection of art of the 1940s and 50s. Highlights of the collection representing the decades of the 1960s through the 80s include works by Andy Warhol, Louise Nevelson, Tony Smith, Josef Albers, Romare Bearden, Dennis Oppenheim, George Segal, Alice Neel, Philip Guston, George McNeil, Melvin Edwards, and Richard Anuskiewicz. In recent years the Museum has demonstrated its growing commitment to contemporary art with the acquisition of works by Chuck Close, Kiki Smith, Ryan McGinley, Alex Prager, Chakaia Booker, Charles Simonds, Vik Muniz, and others. A major gift in 2008 of works from the Herbert and Dorothy Vogel collection greatly augmented the Museum's modern and contemporary holdings with paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Will Barnet, Robert Barry, Lynda Benglis, Richard Hunt, Richard Tuttle, and many others.
1984-1985
Bladen, Ronald
Venous Plexus #2

Full Online Collection

Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection

Since their marriage in 1962, Dorothy and Herbert Vogel (d. 2012) assembled one of America’s most notable collections of contemporary art, especially drawings. As the adventurous couple began to explore the contemporary art scene, devoting time each weekend to visits to New York artists and galleries, they looked for works that appealed to them personally, and works that they wanted to live with, in their one-bedroom apartment in New York City. Civil servants by profession, Herb and Dorothy had limited funds to invest in their acquisitions, and lived solely on Dorothy’s salary as a librarian while using Herb’s postal worker salary to collect. Developing close, supportive friendships with artists who were influential for their collecting, the Vogels became captivated by minimal and conceptual art, finding pleasure in works which others found hard to appreciate. Their collection, however, has always encompassed a variety of aesthetic approaches, including abstract expressionism, post-minimalism, and diverse figurative directions. Since 1991 the Vogels have donated or designated as promised gifts over 1,000 works of art to the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. Furthermore, the Vogels’ collection has continued to grow, to a size that was too large to be housed in any one institution, which led to the creation of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States project. Through this program, the Vogels have donated a total of 2,500 works by 177 artists to 50 museums, personally chosen by the Vogels with the underlying goal of bringing contemporary artworks to institutions that may not otherwise have been able to acquire them. The Montclair Art Museum was fortunate to be designated the New Jersey recipient of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States.

Modern & Contemporary

The Montclair Art Museum’s collection of modern and contemporary art ranges from major works by such early 20th-century artists as George Bellows, Arthur Dove, Elsie Driggs, Marsden Hartley, Edward Hopper, Maurice Prendergast, and Joseph Stella, to significant examples by leading contemporary artists Gregory Crewdson, Barbara Kruger, James Siena, Kay WalkingStick, Carrie Mae Weems, and others. A bequest by artist Moses Soyer and his wife, Ida, greatly augmented the modern collection in 1974 with more than one 100 works by Chaim Gross, Raphael Soyer, Ben Shahn, Reginald Marsh, Phillip Evergood, and others. In 1985 the Museum became a major repository for the paintings, drawings, notebooks, and personal papers of Morgan Russell, a cofounder in 1912–13 of Synchromism, the first American modernist art movement, which stressed the potent role of color. Works by Robert Motherwell, Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko, Adolph Gottlieb, William Baziotes, Steve Wheeler, Kenzo Okada, Norman Lewis, Milton Avery, George Rickey, Richard Diebenkorn, and others exemplify the strengths of the Museum’s collection of art of the 1940s and 50s. Highlights of the collection representing the decades of the 1960s through the 80s include works by Andy Warhol, Louise Nevelson, Tony Smith, Josef Albers, Romare Bearden, Dennis Oppenheim, George Segal, Alice Neel, Philip Guston, George McNeil, Melvin Edwards, and Richard Anuskiewicz. In recent years the Museum has demonstrated its growing commitment to contemporary art with the acquisition of works by Chuck Close, Kiki Smith, Ryan McGinley, Alex Prager, Chakaia Booker, Charles Simonds, Vik Muniz, and others. A major gift in 2008 of works from the Herbert and Dorothy Vogel collection greatly augmented the Museum's modern and contemporary holdings with paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Will Barnet, Robert Barry, Lynda Benglis, Richard Hunt, Richard Tuttle, and many others.
1983
Clough, Charles
Patterson Sims/Davenport Beach

Full Online Collection

Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection

Since their marriage in 1962, Dorothy and Herbert Vogel (d. 2012) assembled one of America’s most notable collections of contemporary art, especially drawings. As the adventurous couple began to explore the contemporary art scene, devoting time each weekend to visits to New York artists and galleries, they looked for works that appealed to them personally, and works that they wanted to live with, in their one-bedroom apartment in New York City. Civil servants by profession, Herb and Dorothy had limited funds to invest in their acquisitions, and lived solely on Dorothy’s salary as a librarian while using Herb’s postal worker salary to collect. Developing close, supportive friendships with artists who were influential for their collecting, the Vogels became captivated by minimal and conceptual art, finding pleasure in works which others found hard to appreciate. Their collection, however, has always encompassed a variety of aesthetic approaches, including abstract expressionism, post-minimalism, and diverse figurative directions. Since 1991 the Vogels have donated or designated as promised gifts over 1,000 works of art to the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. Furthermore, the Vogels’ collection has continued to grow, to a size that was too large to be housed in any one institution, which led to the creation of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States project. Through this program, the Vogels have donated a total of 2,500 works by 177 artists to 50 museums, personally chosen by the Vogels with the underlying goal of bringing contemporary artworks to institutions that may not otherwise have been able to acquire them. The Montclair Art Museum was fortunate to be designated the New Jersey recipient of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States.

Modern & Contemporary

The Montclair Art Museum’s collection of modern and contemporary art ranges from major works by such early 20th-century artists as George Bellows, Arthur Dove, Elsie Driggs, Marsden Hartley, Edward Hopper, Maurice Prendergast, and Joseph Stella, to significant examples by leading contemporary artists Gregory Crewdson, Barbara Kruger, James Siena, Kay WalkingStick, Carrie Mae Weems, and others. A bequest by artist Moses Soyer and his wife, Ida, greatly augmented the modern collection in 1974 with more than one 100 works by Chaim Gross, Raphael Soyer, Ben Shahn, Reginald Marsh, Phillip Evergood, and others. In 1985 the Museum became a major repository for the paintings, drawings, notebooks, and personal papers of Morgan Russell, a cofounder in 1912–13 of Synchromism, the first American modernist art movement, which stressed the potent role of color. Works by Robert Motherwell, Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko, Adolph Gottlieb, William Baziotes, Steve Wheeler, Kenzo Okada, Norman Lewis, Milton Avery, George Rickey, Richard Diebenkorn, and others exemplify the strengths of the Museum’s collection of art of the 1940s and 50s. Highlights of the collection representing the decades of the 1960s through the 80s include works by Andy Warhol, Louise Nevelson, Tony Smith, Josef Albers, Romare Bearden, Dennis Oppenheim, George Segal, Alice Neel, Philip Guston, George McNeil, Melvin Edwards, and Richard Anuskiewicz. In recent years the Museum has demonstrated its growing commitment to contemporary art with the acquisition of works by Chuck Close, Kiki Smith, Ryan McGinley, Alex Prager, Chakaia Booker, Charles Simonds, Vik Muniz, and others. A major gift in 2008 of works from the Herbert and Dorothy Vogel collection greatly augmented the Museum's modern and contemporary holdings with paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Will Barnet, Robert Barry, Lynda Benglis, Richard Hunt, Richard Tuttle, and many others.
1978/1981
Fox, Clark V.
Spring: Jumping Flame

Full Online Collection

Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection

Since their marriage in 1962, Dorothy and Herbert Vogel (d. 2012) assembled one of America’s most notable collections of contemporary art, especially drawings. As the adventurous couple began to explore the contemporary art scene, devoting time each weekend to visits to New York artists and galleries, they looked for works that appealed to them personally, and works that they wanted to live with, in their one-bedroom apartment in New York City. Civil servants by profession, Herb and Dorothy had limited funds to invest in their acquisitions, and lived solely on Dorothy’s salary as a librarian while using Herb’s postal worker salary to collect. Developing close, supportive friendships with artists who were influential for their collecting, the Vogels became captivated by minimal and conceptual art, finding pleasure in works which others found hard to appreciate. Their collection, however, has always encompassed a variety of aesthetic approaches, including abstract expressionism, post-minimalism, and diverse figurative directions. Since 1991 the Vogels have donated or designated as promised gifts over 1,000 works of art to the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. Furthermore, the Vogels’ collection has continued to grow, to a size that was too large to be housed in any one institution, which led to the creation of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States project. Through this program, the Vogels have donated a total of 2,500 works by 177 artists to 50 museums, personally chosen by the Vogels with the underlying goal of bringing contemporary artworks to institutions that may not otherwise have been able to acquire them. The Montclair Art Museum was fortunate to be designated the New Jersey recipient of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States.

Modern & Contemporary

The Montclair Art Museum’s collection of modern and contemporary art ranges from major works by such early 20th-century artists as George Bellows, Arthur Dove, Elsie Driggs, Marsden Hartley, Edward Hopper, Maurice Prendergast, and Joseph Stella, to significant examples by leading contemporary artists Gregory Crewdson, Barbara Kruger, James Siena, Kay WalkingStick, Carrie Mae Weems, and others. A bequest by artist Moses Soyer and his wife, Ida, greatly augmented the modern collection in 1974 with more than one 100 works by Chaim Gross, Raphael Soyer, Ben Shahn, Reginald Marsh, Phillip Evergood, and others. In 1985 the Museum became a major repository for the paintings, drawings, notebooks, and personal papers of Morgan Russell, a cofounder in 1912–13 of Synchromism, the first American modernist art movement, which stressed the potent role of color. Works by Robert Motherwell, Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko, Adolph Gottlieb, William Baziotes, Steve Wheeler, Kenzo Okada, Norman Lewis, Milton Avery, George Rickey, Richard Diebenkorn, and others exemplify the strengths of the Museum’s collection of art of the 1940s and 50s. Highlights of the collection representing the decades of the 1960s through the 80s include works by Andy Warhol, Louise Nevelson, Tony Smith, Josef Albers, Romare Bearden, Dennis Oppenheim, George Segal, Alice Neel, Philip Guston, George McNeil, Melvin Edwards, and Richard Anuskiewicz. In recent years the Museum has demonstrated its growing commitment to contemporary art with the acquisition of works by Chuck Close, Kiki Smith, Ryan McGinley, Alex Prager, Chakaia Booker, Charles Simonds, Vik Muniz, and others. A major gift in 2008 of works from the Herbert and Dorothy Vogel collection greatly augmented the Museum's modern and contemporary holdings with paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Will Barnet, Robert Barry, Lynda Benglis, Richard Hunt, Richard Tuttle, and many others.
1979
Francisco, Richard
Untitled

Full Online Collection

Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection

Since their marriage in 1962, Dorothy and Herbert Vogel (d. 2012) assembled one of America’s most notable collections of contemporary art, especially drawings. As the adventurous couple began to explore the contemporary art scene, devoting time each weekend to visits to New York artists and galleries, they looked for works that appealed to them personally, and works that they wanted to live with, in their one-bedroom apartment in New York City. Civil servants by profession, Herb and Dorothy had limited funds to invest in their acquisitions, and lived solely on Dorothy’s salary as a librarian while using Herb’s postal worker salary to collect. Developing close, supportive friendships with artists who were influential for their collecting, the Vogels became captivated by minimal and conceptual art, finding pleasure in works which others found hard to appreciate. Their collection, however, has always encompassed a variety of aesthetic approaches, including abstract expressionism, post-minimalism, and diverse figurative directions. Since 1991 the Vogels have donated or designated as promised gifts over 1,000 works of art to the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. Furthermore, the Vogels’ collection has continued to grow, to a size that was too large to be housed in any one institution, which led to the creation of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States project. Through this program, the Vogels have donated a total of 2,500 works by 177 artists to 50 museums, personally chosen by the Vogels with the underlying goal of bringing contemporary artworks to institutions that may not otherwise have been able to acquire them. The Montclair Art Museum was fortunate to be designated the New Jersey recipient of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States.

Modern & Contemporary

The Montclair Art Museum’s collection of modern and contemporary art ranges from major works by such early 20th-century artists as George Bellows, Arthur Dove, Elsie Driggs, Marsden Hartley, Edward Hopper, Maurice Prendergast, and Joseph Stella, to significant examples by leading contemporary artists Gregory Crewdson, Barbara Kruger, James Siena, Kay WalkingStick, Carrie Mae Weems, and others. A bequest by artist Moses Soyer and his wife, Ida, greatly augmented the modern collection in 1974 with more than one 100 works by Chaim Gross, Raphael Soyer, Ben Shahn, Reginald Marsh, Phillip Evergood, and others. In 1985 the Museum became a major repository for the paintings, drawings, notebooks, and personal papers of Morgan Russell, a cofounder in 1912–13 of Synchromism, the first American modernist art movement, which stressed the potent role of color. Works by Robert Motherwell, Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko, Adolph Gottlieb, William Baziotes, Steve Wheeler, Kenzo Okada, Norman Lewis, Milton Avery, George Rickey, Richard Diebenkorn, and others exemplify the strengths of the Museum’s collection of art of the 1940s and 50s. Highlights of the collection representing the decades of the 1960s through the 80s include works by Andy Warhol, Louise Nevelson, Tony Smith, Josef Albers, Romare Bearden, Dennis Oppenheim, George Segal, Alice Neel, Philip Guston, George McNeil, Melvin Edwards, and Richard Anuskiewicz. In recent years the Museum has demonstrated its growing commitment to contemporary art with the acquisition of works by Chuck Close, Kiki Smith, Ryan McGinley, Alex Prager, Chakaia Booker, Charles Simonds, Vik Muniz, and others. A major gift in 2008 of works from the Herbert and Dorothy Vogel collection greatly augmented the Museum's modern and contemporary holdings with paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Will Barnet, Robert Barry, Lynda Benglis, Richard Hunt, Richard Tuttle, and many others.
1980
Hazlitt, Don
Untitled

Full Online Collection

Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection

Since their marriage in 1962, Dorothy and Herbert Vogel (d. 2012) assembled one of America’s most notable collections of contemporary art, especially drawings. As the adventurous couple began to explore the contemporary art scene, devoting time each weekend to visits to New York artists and galleries, they looked for works that appealed to them personally, and works that they wanted to live with, in their one-bedroom apartment in New York City. Civil servants by profession, Herb and Dorothy had limited funds to invest in their acquisitions, and lived solely on Dorothy’s salary as a librarian while using Herb’s postal worker salary to collect. Developing close, supportive friendships with artists who were influential for their collecting, the Vogels became captivated by minimal and conceptual art, finding pleasure in works which others found hard to appreciate. Their collection, however, has always encompassed a variety of aesthetic approaches, including abstract expressionism, post-minimalism, and diverse figurative directions. Since 1991 the Vogels have donated or designated as promised gifts over 1,000 works of art to the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. Furthermore, the Vogels’ collection has continued to grow, to a size that was too large to be housed in any one institution, which led to the creation of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States project. Through this program, the Vogels have donated a total of 2,500 works by 177 artists to 50 museums, personally chosen by the Vogels with the underlying goal of bringing contemporary artworks to institutions that may not otherwise have been able to acquire them. The Montclair Art Museum was fortunate to be designated the New Jersey recipient of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States.

Modern & Contemporary

The Montclair Art Museum’s collection of modern and contemporary art ranges from major works by such early 20th-century artists as George Bellows, Arthur Dove, Elsie Driggs, Marsden Hartley, Edward Hopper, Maurice Prendergast, and Joseph Stella, to significant examples by leading contemporary artists Gregory Crewdson, Barbara Kruger, James Siena, Kay WalkingStick, Carrie Mae Weems, and others. A bequest by artist Moses Soyer and his wife, Ida, greatly augmented the modern collection in 1974 with more than one 100 works by Chaim Gross, Raphael Soyer, Ben Shahn, Reginald Marsh, Phillip Evergood, and others. In 1985 the Museum became a major repository for the paintings, drawings, notebooks, and personal papers of Morgan Russell, a cofounder in 1912–13 of Synchromism, the first American modernist art movement, which stressed the potent role of color. Works by Robert Motherwell, Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko, Adolph Gottlieb, William Baziotes, Steve Wheeler, Kenzo Okada, Norman Lewis, Milton Avery, George Rickey, Richard Diebenkorn, and others exemplify the strengths of the Museum’s collection of art of the 1940s and 50s. Highlights of the collection representing the decades of the 1960s through the 80s include works by Andy Warhol, Louise Nevelson, Tony Smith, Josef Albers, Romare Bearden, Dennis Oppenheim, George Segal, Alice Neel, Philip Guston, George McNeil, Melvin Edwards, and Richard Anuskiewicz. In recent years the Museum has demonstrated its growing commitment to contemporary art with the acquisition of works by Chuck Close, Kiki Smith, Ryan McGinley, Alex Prager, Chakaia Booker, Charles Simonds, Vik Muniz, and others. A major gift in 2008 of works from the Herbert and Dorothy Vogel collection greatly augmented the Museum's modern and contemporary holdings with paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Will Barnet, Robert Barry, Lynda Benglis, Richard Hunt, Richard Tuttle, and many others.
1971
Jensen, Bill
Untitled

Full Online Collection

Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection

Since their marriage in 1962, Dorothy and Herbert Vogel (d. 2012) assembled one of America’s most notable collections of contemporary art, especially drawings. As the adventurous couple began to explore the contemporary art scene, devoting time each weekend to visits to New York artists and galleries, they looked for works that appealed to them personally, and works that they wanted to live with, in their one-bedroom apartment in New York City. Civil servants by profession, Herb and Dorothy had limited funds to invest in their acquisitions, and lived solely on Dorothy’s salary as a librarian while using Herb’s postal worker salary to collect. Developing close, supportive friendships with artists who were influential for their collecting, the Vogels became captivated by minimal and conceptual art, finding pleasure in works which others found hard to appreciate. Their collection, however, has always encompassed a variety of aesthetic approaches, including abstract expressionism, post-minimalism, and diverse figurative directions. Since 1991 the Vogels have donated or designated as promised gifts over 1,000 works of art to the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. Furthermore, the Vogels’ collection has continued to grow, to a size that was too large to be housed in any one institution, which led to the creation of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States project. Through this program, the Vogels have donated a total of 2,500 works by 177 artists to 50 museums, personally chosen by the Vogels with the underlying goal of bringing contemporary artworks to institutions that may not otherwise have been able to acquire them. The Montclair Art Museum was fortunate to be designated the New Jersey recipient of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States.

Modern & Contemporary

The Montclair Art Museum’s collection of modern and contemporary art ranges from major works by such early 20th-century artists as George Bellows, Arthur Dove, Elsie Driggs, Marsden Hartley, Edward Hopper, Maurice Prendergast, and Joseph Stella, to significant examples by leading contemporary artists Gregory Crewdson, Barbara Kruger, James Siena, Kay WalkingStick, Carrie Mae Weems, and others. A bequest by artist Moses Soyer and his wife, Ida, greatly augmented the modern collection in 1974 with more than one 100 works by Chaim Gross, Raphael Soyer, Ben Shahn, Reginald Marsh, Phillip Evergood, and others. In 1985 the Museum became a major repository for the paintings, drawings, notebooks, and personal papers of Morgan Russell, a cofounder in 1912–13 of Synchromism, the first American modernist art movement, which stressed the potent role of color. Works by Robert Motherwell, Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko, Adolph Gottlieb, William Baziotes, Steve Wheeler, Kenzo Okada, Norman Lewis, Milton Avery, George Rickey, Richard Diebenkorn, and others exemplify the strengths of the Museum’s collection of art of the 1940s and 50s. Highlights of the collection representing the decades of the 1960s through the 80s include works by Andy Warhol, Louise Nevelson, Tony Smith, Josef Albers, Romare Bearden, Dennis Oppenheim, George Segal, Alice Neel, Philip Guston, George McNeil, Melvin Edwards, and Richard Anuskiewicz. In recent years the Museum has demonstrated its growing commitment to contemporary art with the acquisition of works by Chuck Close, Kiki Smith, Ryan McGinley, Alex Prager, Chakaia Booker, Charles Simonds, Vik Muniz, and others. A major gift in 2008 of works from the Herbert and Dorothy Vogel collection greatly augmented the Museum's modern and contemporary holdings with paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Will Barnet, Robert Barry, Lynda Benglis, Richard Hunt, Richard Tuttle, and many others.
1994
Johnson, Martin
FOR

Full Online Collection

Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection

Since their marriage in 1962, Dorothy and Herbert Vogel (d. 2012) assembled one of America’s most notable collections of contemporary art, especially drawings. As the adventurous couple began to explore the contemporary art scene, devoting time each weekend to visits to New York artists and galleries, they looked for works that appealed to them personally, and works that they wanted to live with, in their one-bedroom apartment in New York City. Civil servants by profession, Herb and Dorothy had limited funds to invest in their acquisitions, and lived solely on Dorothy’s salary as a librarian while using Herb’s postal worker salary to collect. Developing close, supportive friendships with artists who were influential for their collecting, the Vogels became captivated by minimal and conceptual art, finding pleasure in works which others found hard to appreciate. Their collection, however, has always encompassed a variety of aesthetic approaches, including abstract expressionism, post-minimalism, and diverse figurative directions. Since 1991 the Vogels have donated or designated as promised gifts over 1,000 works of art to the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. Furthermore, the Vogels’ collection has continued to grow, to a size that was too large to be housed in any one institution, which led to the creation of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States project. Through this program, the Vogels have donated a total of 2,500 works by 177 artists to 50 museums, personally chosen by the Vogels with the underlying goal of bringing contemporary artworks to institutions that may not otherwise have been able to acquire them. The Montclair Art Museum was fortunate to be designated the New Jersey recipient of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States.

Modern & Contemporary

The Montclair Art Museum’s collection of modern and contemporary art ranges from major works by such early 20th-century artists as George Bellows, Arthur Dove, Elsie Driggs, Marsden Hartley, Edward Hopper, Maurice Prendergast, and Joseph Stella, to significant examples by leading contemporary artists Gregory Crewdson, Barbara Kruger, James Siena, Kay WalkingStick, Carrie Mae Weems, and others. A bequest by artist Moses Soyer and his wife, Ida, greatly augmented the modern collection in 1974 with more than one 100 works by Chaim Gross, Raphael Soyer, Ben Shahn, Reginald Marsh, Phillip Evergood, and others. In 1985 the Museum became a major repository for the paintings, drawings, notebooks, and personal papers of Morgan Russell, a cofounder in 1912–13 of Synchromism, the first American modernist art movement, which stressed the potent role of color. Works by Robert Motherwell, Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko, Adolph Gottlieb, William Baziotes, Steve Wheeler, Kenzo Okada, Norman Lewis, Milton Avery, George Rickey, Richard Diebenkorn, and others exemplify the strengths of the Museum’s collection of art of the 1940s and 50s. Highlights of the collection representing the decades of the 1960s through the 80s include works by Andy Warhol, Louise Nevelson, Tony Smith, Josef Albers, Romare Bearden, Dennis Oppenheim, George Segal, Alice Neel, Philip Guston, George McNeil, Melvin Edwards, and Richard Anuskiewicz. In recent years the Museum has demonstrated its growing commitment to contemporary art with the acquisition of works by Chuck Close, Kiki Smith, Ryan McGinley, Alex Prager, Chakaia Booker, Charles Simonds, Vik Muniz, and others. A major gift in 2008 of works from the Herbert and Dorothy Vogel collection greatly augmented the Museum's modern and contemporary holdings with paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Will Barnet, Robert Barry, Lynda Benglis, Richard Hunt, Richard Tuttle, and many others.
1989
Johnson, Martin
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