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Cradleboard

Full Online Collection

Native American Collection

The Native American collection was initiated by Mrs. Henry Lang, one of the founders of MAM. It represents the cultural development of various peoples from the seven major culture areas in the United States--the Northwest Coast, California, the Southwest, the Plains, the Woodlands, the Southeast, and the Arctic. With more than 4,000 objects, the collection has particularly distinguished examples of basketry and jewelry. Contemporary artists such as Dan Namingha, Tony Abeyta, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, and Allan Houser are represented as well. Native American artists and artisans are frequent visitors to the Museum, offering talks and demonstrations.

Founding Collection

Ever since opening its doors in 1914, the Montclair Art Museum has been a significant community and national visual arts center. With more than 60,000 visitors a year, the Museum has been unique as a prominent art and educational institution in a suburban locale. During the late 19th-century, the bucolic town of Montclair evolved into a lively community of artists and collectors, including the civic-minded William T. Evans. This prolific collector of American art pledged 36 American paintings for a new gallery in 1909. He was soon supported in his cause by painter and Montclair resident Florence Rand Lang, who made a generous financial commitment to fund the construction of a proper, fireproof museum. Furthermore, a room was to be devoted to the presentation of the Native American art collection assembled by her mother Annie Valentine Rand. Attended by over 500 people, the Museum’s opening celebration featured a collection of paintings and sculptures by such important artists of the day as Ralph Albert Blakelock, Leon Dabo, Theodore Robinson, Daniel Chester French, and Charles Warren Eaton, a resident of Bloomfield, New Jersey. A loan exhibition of works by sixty local artists was also on view, as well as several hundred Native American artifacts donated by Lang.
ca. 1900
Potlatch hat

Full Online Collection

Native American Collection

The Native American collection was initiated by Mrs. Henry Lang, one of the founders of MAM. It represents the cultural development of various peoples from the seven major culture areas in the United States--the Northwest Coast, California, the Southwest, the Plains, the Woodlands, the Southeast, and the Arctic. With more than 4,000 objects, the collection has particularly distinguished examples of basketry and jewelry. Contemporary artists such as Dan Namingha, Tony Abeyta, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, and Allan Houser are represented as well. Native American artists and artisans are frequent visitors to the Museum, offering talks and demonstrations.

Founding Collection

Ever since opening its doors in 1914, the Montclair Art Museum has been a significant community and national visual arts center. With more than 60,000 visitors a year, the Museum has been unique as a prominent art and educational institution in a suburban locale. During the late 19th-century, the bucolic town of Montclair evolved into a lively community of artists and collectors, including the civic-minded William T. Evans. This prolific collector of American art pledged 36 American paintings for a new gallery in 1909. He was soon supported in his cause by painter and Montclair resident Florence Rand Lang, who made a generous financial commitment to fund the construction of a proper, fireproof museum. Furthermore, a room was to be devoted to the presentation of the Native American art collection assembled by her mother Annie Valentine Rand. Attended by over 500 people, the Museum’s opening celebration featured a collection of paintings and sculptures by such important artists of the day as Ralph Albert Blakelock, Leon Dabo, Theodore Robinson, Daniel Chester French, and Charles Warren Eaton, a resident of Bloomfield, New Jersey. A loan exhibition of works by sixty local artists was also on view, as well as several hundred Native American artifacts donated by Lang.
ca. 1910
Basket

Full Online Collection

Native American Collection

The Native American collection was initiated by Mrs. Henry Lang, one of the founders of MAM. It represents the cultural development of various peoples from the seven major culture areas in the United States--the Northwest Coast, California, the Southwest, the Plains, the Woodlands, the Southeast, and the Arctic. With more than 4,000 objects, the collection has particularly distinguished examples of basketry and jewelry. Contemporary artists such as Dan Namingha, Tony Abeyta, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, and Allan Houser are represented as well. Native American artists and artisans are frequent visitors to the Museum, offering talks and demonstrations.

Founding Collection

Ever since opening its doors in 1914, the Montclair Art Museum has been a significant community and national visual arts center. With more than 60,000 visitors a year, the Museum has been unique as a prominent art and educational institution in a suburban locale. During the late 19th-century, the bucolic town of Montclair evolved into a lively community of artists and collectors, including the civic-minded William T. Evans. This prolific collector of American art pledged 36 American paintings for a new gallery in 1909. He was soon supported in his cause by painter and Montclair resident Florence Rand Lang, who made a generous financial commitment to fund the construction of a proper, fireproof museum. Furthermore, a room was to be devoted to the presentation of the Native American art collection assembled by her mother Annie Valentine Rand. Attended by over 500 people, the Museum’s opening celebration featured a collection of paintings and sculptures by such important artists of the day as Ralph Albert Blakelock, Leon Dabo, Theodore Robinson, Daniel Chester French, and Charles Warren Eaton, a resident of Bloomfield, New Jersey. A loan exhibition of works by sixty local artists was also on view, as well as several hundred Native American artifacts donated by Lang.
ca. 1900
Basket

Full Online Collection

Native American Collection

The Native American collection was initiated by Mrs. Henry Lang, one of the founders of MAM. It represents the cultural development of various peoples from the seven major culture areas in the United States--the Northwest Coast, California, the Southwest, the Plains, the Woodlands, the Southeast, and the Arctic. With more than 4,000 objects, the collection has particularly distinguished examples of basketry and jewelry. Contemporary artists such as Dan Namingha, Tony Abeyta, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, and Allan Houser are represented as well. Native American artists and artisans are frequent visitors to the Museum, offering talks and demonstrations.

100 Works for 100 Years

To celebrate its centennial, the Montclair Art Museum is featuring 100 works of American and Native American art from the collection, throughout its galleries and grounds. Identified with special labels, these works in a variety of mediums, ranging in date from the 18th century to the present, have been installed in phases throughout Fall 2013, with all on view as of January 15, 2014, the Museum's official birthday. Works by Asher B. Durand, John Frederick Kensett, Edward Hopper, Winslow Homer, Lorna Simpson, Will Barnet, and many others are featured. For more information about the museum’s history and events during its centennial year, please visit www.montclairartmuseum.org.

Founding Collection

Ever since opening its doors in 1914, the Montclair Art Museum has been a significant community and national visual arts center. With more than 60,000 visitors a year, the Museum has been unique as a prominent art and educational institution in a suburban locale. During the late 19th-century, the bucolic town of Montclair evolved into a lively community of artists and collectors, including the civic-minded William T. Evans. This prolific collector of American art pledged 36 American paintings for a new gallery in 1909. He was soon supported in his cause by painter and Montclair resident Florence Rand Lang, who made a generous financial commitment to fund the construction of a proper, fireproof museum. Furthermore, a room was to be devoted to the presentation of the Native American art collection assembled by her mother Annie Valentine Rand. Attended by over 500 people, the Museum’s opening celebration featured a collection of paintings and sculptures by such important artists of the day as Ralph Albert Blakelock, Leon Dabo, Theodore Robinson, Daniel Chester French, and Charles Warren Eaton, a resident of Bloomfield, New Jersey. A loan exhibition of works by sixty local artists was also on view, as well as several hundred Native American artifacts donated by Lang.
ca. 1910
Basket

Full Online Collection

Native American Collection

The Native American collection was initiated by Mrs. Henry Lang, one of the founders of MAM. It represents the cultural development of various peoples from the seven major culture areas in the United States--the Northwest Coast, California, the Southwest, the Plains, the Woodlands, the Southeast, and the Arctic. With more than 4,000 objects, the collection has particularly distinguished examples of basketry and jewelry. Contemporary artists such as Dan Namingha, Tony Abeyta, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, and Allan Houser are represented as well. Native American artists and artisans are frequent visitors to the Museum, offering talks and demonstrations.

Founding Collection

Ever since opening its doors in 1914, the Montclair Art Museum has been a significant community and national visual arts center. With more than 60,000 visitors a year, the Museum has been unique as a prominent art and educational institution in a suburban locale. During the late 19th-century, the bucolic town of Montclair evolved into a lively community of artists and collectors, including the civic-minded William T. Evans. This prolific collector of American art pledged 36 American paintings for a new gallery in 1909. He was soon supported in his cause by painter and Montclair resident Florence Rand Lang, who made a generous financial commitment to fund the construction of a proper, fireproof museum. Furthermore, a room was to be devoted to the presentation of the Native American art collection assembled by her mother Annie Valentine Rand. Attended by over 500 people, the Museum’s opening celebration featured a collection of paintings and sculptures by such important artists of the day as Ralph Albert Blakelock, Leon Dabo, Theodore Robinson, Daniel Chester French, and Charles Warren Eaton, a resident of Bloomfield, New Jersey. A loan exhibition of works by sixty local artists was also on view, as well as several hundred Native American artifacts donated by Lang.
ca. 1910
Basket

Full Online Collection

Native American Collection

The Native American collection was initiated by Mrs. Henry Lang, one of the founders of MAM. It represents the cultural development of various peoples from the seven major culture areas in the United States--the Northwest Coast, California, the Southwest, the Plains, the Woodlands, the Southeast, and the Arctic. With more than 4,000 objects, the collection has particularly distinguished examples of basketry and jewelry. Contemporary artists such as Dan Namingha, Tony Abeyta, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, and Allan Houser are represented as well. Native American artists and artisans are frequent visitors to the Museum, offering talks and demonstrations.

Founding Collection

Ever since opening its doors in 1914, the Montclair Art Museum has been a significant community and national visual arts center. With more than 60,000 visitors a year, the Museum has been unique as a prominent art and educational institution in a suburban locale. During the late 19th-century, the bucolic town of Montclair evolved into a lively community of artists and collectors, including the civic-minded William T. Evans. This prolific collector of American art pledged 36 American paintings for a new gallery in 1909. He was soon supported in his cause by painter and Montclair resident Florence Rand Lang, who made a generous financial commitment to fund the construction of a proper, fireproof museum. Furthermore, a room was to be devoted to the presentation of the Native American art collection assembled by her mother Annie Valentine Rand. Attended by over 500 people, the Museum’s opening celebration featured a collection of paintings and sculptures by such important artists of the day as Ralph Albert Blakelock, Leon Dabo, Theodore Robinson, Daniel Chester French, and Charles Warren Eaton, a resident of Bloomfield, New Jersey. A loan exhibition of works by sixty local artists was also on view, as well as several hundred Native American artifacts donated by Lang.
ca. 1910
Man's Shirt

Full Online Collection

Native American Collection

The Native American collection was initiated by Mrs. Henry Lang, one of the founders of MAM. It represents the cultural development of various peoples from the seven major culture areas in the United States--the Northwest Coast, California, the Southwest, the Plains, the Woodlands, the Southeast, and the Arctic. With more than 4,000 objects, the collection has particularly distinguished examples of basketry and jewelry. Contemporary artists such as Dan Namingha, Tony Abeyta, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, and Allan Houser are represented as well. Native American artists and artisans are frequent visitors to the Museum, offering talks and demonstrations.

100 Works for 100 Years

To celebrate its centennial, the Montclair Art Museum is featuring 100 works of American and Native American art from the collection, throughout its galleries and grounds. Identified with special labels, these works in a variety of mediums, ranging in date from the 18th century to the present, have been installed in phases throughout Fall 2013, with all on view as of January 15, 2014, the Museum's official birthday. Works by Asher B. Durand, John Frederick Kensett, Edward Hopper, Winslow Homer, Lorna Simpson, Will Barnet, and many others are featured. For more information about the museum’s history and events during its centennial year, please visit www.montclairartmuseum.org.

Founding Collection

Ever since opening its doors in 1914, the Montclair Art Museum has been a significant community and national visual arts center. With more than 60,000 visitors a year, the Museum has been unique as a prominent art and educational institution in a suburban locale. During the late 19th-century, the bucolic town of Montclair evolved into a lively community of artists and collectors, including the civic-minded William T. Evans. This prolific collector of American art pledged 36 American paintings for a new gallery in 1909. He was soon supported in his cause by painter and Montclair resident Florence Rand Lang, who made a generous financial commitment to fund the construction of a proper, fireproof museum. Furthermore, a room was to be devoted to the presentation of the Native American art collection assembled by her mother Annie Valentine Rand. Attended by over 500 people, the Museum’s opening celebration featured a collection of paintings and sculptures by such important artists of the day as Ralph Albert Blakelock, Leon Dabo, Theodore Robinson, Daniel Chester French, and Charles Warren Eaton, a resident of Bloomfield, New Jersey. A loan exhibition of works by sixty local artists was also on view, as well as several hundred Native American artifacts donated by Lang.
ca. 1900
Raven rattle

Full Online Collection

Native American Collection

The Native American collection was initiated by Mrs. Henry Lang, one of the founders of MAM. It represents the cultural development of various peoples from the seven major culture areas in the United States--the Northwest Coast, California, the Southwest, the Plains, the Woodlands, the Southeast, and the Arctic. With more than 4,000 objects, the collection has particularly distinguished examples of basketry and jewelry. Contemporary artists such as Dan Namingha, Tony Abeyta, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, and Allan Houser are represented as well. Native American artists and artisans are frequent visitors to the Museum, offering talks and demonstrations.

100 Works for 100 Years

To celebrate its centennial, the Montclair Art Museum is featuring 100 works of American and Native American art from the collection, throughout its galleries and grounds. Identified with special labels, these works in a variety of mediums, ranging in date from the 18th century to the present, have been installed in phases throughout Fall 2013, with all on view as of January 15, 2014, the Museum's official birthday. Works by Asher B. Durand, John Frederick Kensett, Edward Hopper, Winslow Homer, Lorna Simpson, Will Barnet, and many others are featured. For more information about the museum’s history and events during its centennial year, please visit www.montclairartmuseum.org.

Founding Collection

Ever since opening its doors in 1914, the Montclair Art Museum has been a significant community and national visual arts center. With more than 60,000 visitors a year, the Museum has been unique as a prominent art and educational institution in a suburban locale. During the late 19th-century, the bucolic town of Montclair evolved into a lively community of artists and collectors, including the civic-minded William T. Evans. This prolific collector of American art pledged 36 American paintings for a new gallery in 1909. He was soon supported in his cause by painter and Montclair resident Florence Rand Lang, who made a generous financial commitment to fund the construction of a proper, fireproof museum. Furthermore, a room was to be devoted to the presentation of the Native American art collection assembled by her mother Annie Valentine Rand. Attended by over 500 people, the Museum’s opening celebration featured a collection of paintings and sculptures by such important artists of the day as Ralph Albert Blakelock, Leon Dabo, Theodore Robinson, Daniel Chester French, and Charles Warren Eaton, a resident of Bloomfield, New Jersey. A loan exhibition of works by sixty local artists was also on view, as well as several hundred Native American artifacts donated by Lang.
ca. 1900
Spoon

Full Online Collection

Native American Collection

The Native American collection was initiated by Mrs. Henry Lang, one of the founders of MAM. It represents the cultural development of various peoples from the seven major culture areas in the United States--the Northwest Coast, California, the Southwest, the Plains, the Woodlands, the Southeast, and the Arctic. With more than 4,000 objects, the collection has particularly distinguished examples of basketry and jewelry. Contemporary artists such as Dan Namingha, Tony Abeyta, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, and Allan Houser are represented as well. Native American artists and artisans are frequent visitors to the Museum, offering talks and demonstrations.

Founding Collection

Ever since opening its doors in 1914, the Montclair Art Museum has been a significant community and national visual arts center. With more than 60,000 visitors a year, the Museum has been unique as a prominent art and educational institution in a suburban locale. During the late 19th-century, the bucolic town of Montclair evolved into a lively community of artists and collectors, including the civic-minded William T. Evans. This prolific collector of American art pledged 36 American paintings for a new gallery in 1909. He was soon supported in his cause by painter and Montclair resident Florence Rand Lang, who made a generous financial commitment to fund the construction of a proper, fireproof museum. Furthermore, a room was to be devoted to the presentation of the Native American art collection assembled by her mother Annie Valentine Rand. Attended by over 500 people, the Museum’s opening celebration featured a collection of paintings and sculptures by such important artists of the day as Ralph Albert Blakelock, Leon Dabo, Theodore Robinson, Daniel Chester French, and Charles Warren Eaton, a resident of Bloomfield, New Jersey. A loan exhibition of works by sixty local artists was also on view, as well as several hundred Native American artifacts donated by Lang.
ca. 1875
Bowl

Full Online Collection

Native American Collection

The Native American collection was initiated by Mrs. Henry Lang, one of the founders of MAM. It represents the cultural development of various peoples from the seven major culture areas in the United States--the Northwest Coast, California, the Southwest, the Plains, the Woodlands, the Southeast, and the Arctic. With more than 4,000 objects, the collection has particularly distinguished examples of basketry and jewelry. Contemporary artists such as Dan Namingha, Tony Abeyta, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, and Allan Houser are represented as well. Native American artists and artisans are frequent visitors to the Museum, offering talks and demonstrations.

Founding Collection

Ever since opening its doors in 1914, the Montclair Art Museum has been a significant community and national visual arts center. With more than 60,000 visitors a year, the Museum has been unique as a prominent art and educational institution in a suburban locale. During the late 19th-century, the bucolic town of Montclair evolved into a lively community of artists and collectors, including the civic-minded William T. Evans. This prolific collector of American art pledged 36 American paintings for a new gallery in 1909. He was soon supported in his cause by painter and Montclair resident Florence Rand Lang, who made a generous financial commitment to fund the construction of a proper, fireproof museum. Furthermore, a room was to be devoted to the presentation of the Native American art collection assembled by her mother Annie Valentine Rand. Attended by over 500 people, the Museum’s opening celebration featured a collection of paintings and sculptures by such important artists of the day as Ralph Albert Blakelock, Leon Dabo, Theodore Robinson, Daniel Chester French, and Charles Warren Eaton, a resident of Bloomfield, New Jersey. A loan exhibition of works by sixty local artists was also on view, as well as several hundred Native American artifacts donated by Lang.
ca. 1900
Basket

Full Online Collection

Native American Collection

The Native American collection was initiated by Mrs. Henry Lang, one of the founders of MAM. It represents the cultural development of various peoples from the seven major culture areas in the United States--the Northwest Coast, California, the Southwest, the Plains, the Woodlands, the Southeast, and the Arctic. With more than 4,000 objects, the collection has particularly distinguished examples of basketry and jewelry. Contemporary artists such as Dan Namingha, Tony Abeyta, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, and Allan Houser are represented as well. Native American artists and artisans are frequent visitors to the Museum, offering talks and demonstrations.
n.d.
Basket

Full Online Collection

Native American Collection

The Native American collection was initiated by Mrs. Henry Lang, one of the founders of MAM. It represents the cultural development of various peoples from the seven major culture areas in the United States--the Northwest Coast, California, the Southwest, the Plains, the Woodlands, the Southeast, and the Arctic. With more than 4,000 objects, the collection has particularly distinguished examples of basketry and jewelry. Contemporary artists such as Dan Namingha, Tony Abeyta, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, and Allan Houser are represented as well. Native American artists and artisans are frequent visitors to the Museum, offering talks and demonstrations.
ca. 1890
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